“I do not climb so high…

“I do not climb so high. A long time ago I decided that my universe will be the soul and the heart of man. It is there that I look for nuances of every feeling which I transfer to music as well as I can.”

Frederic Chopin

“I do not climb so high. A long time ago I decided that my universe will be the soul and the heart of man. It is there that I look for nuances of every feeling which I transfer to music as well as I can.”

Frederic Chopin

A Poem by Chopin’s dear friend Adam Mickiewicz that Chopin composed a song for;

Out of my sight! Leave me I beg you!

Out of my heart! I cannot go against you.

Out of my thoughts! No, that ultimate surrender

Our memories could ever render.

As evening shadows lengthen

And stretch their sad imploring arms,

My face will shine brighter in your mind

The further you are from me.

In every season in places close to our hearts,

Where we have shared laughter, tears and glances,

Always and everywhere shall I be with you,

For everywhere I have left a part of my soul.

Adam Mickiewicz

Why do we live such a miserable life that devours us and is only for the purpose of making corpses?

from Chopin’s notebook;

The clocks from the tower of Stuttgart strike the hour in the night. How many become corpses at this moment in the world? Mothers are lost to their children, children to mothers… How much sorrow at this moment over the corpses, and how much consolation! Virtue and vice are the same , they are sisters when corpses. It seems that death is the best action of a human being… and what is worst? Birth as being just the contrary to the good action, therefore I am justified in being angry at having come into this world. Why do we live such a miserable life that devours us and is only for the purpose of making corpses?”

Frederic Chopin

from Chopin’s notebook;

The clocks from the tower of Stuttgart strike the hour in the night. How many become corpses at this moment in the world? Mothers are lost to their children, children to mothers… How much sorrow at this moment over the corpses, and how much consolation! Virtue and vice are the same , they are sisters when corpses. It seems that death is the best action of a human being… and what is worst? Birth as being just the contrary to the good action, therefore I am justified in being angry at having come into this world. Why do we live such a miserable life that devours us and is only for the purpose of making corpses?”

An interview with our pianist; Emir Gamsızoglu on ”Pianists From the Inside”

An interview with our pianist; Emir Gamsızoğlu

“Emir has the most unique life story of coming to music by chance at his 20, an age considered too late by all classical music standards. Emir has proved that in every rule there is an exception” – Chen Halevi

An interview with our pianist; Emir Gamsızoğlu

“Emir has the most unique life story of coming to music by chance at his 20, an age considered too late by all classical music standards. Emir has proved that in every rule there is an exception” – Chen Halevi

Please click the link above.

“If the newspapers cut me up so much that I shall not venture before the world again, I have resolved to become a house painter; that would be as easy as anything else, and I should, at any rate, still be an artist! “

CHOPIN’s Letter from Vienna

Vienna, Wednesday, August 12th, 1829,

You know of my intention, my beloved ones, from my last letter. Yesterday (Tuesday) at seven o’clock in the evening, I appeared before a Viennese public for the first time, at the Imperial Opera House. Here, an evening concert in the theatre is called a musical academy. As I played gratuitously, Count Gallenberg expedited the ar- rangements for my appearance. 

The following was the programme : 

Overture, by Beethoven. 

My Variations. 

Song, by Fraulein Veltheim. 

My Cracovieime. 

A Ballet, in conclusion. 

The orchestra accompanied so badly at the rehearsal that I was obliged to substitute a “Free Fantasia ” for the Rondo. Directly I appeared I was greeted with cries of “Bravo,” and, after each variation, the audience shouted this welcome word so lustily that I could not hear the tutti of the orchestra. I had such a hearty recall, that I was obliged to come forward twice to bow my acknowledgements. I must confess that I was not quite satisfied myself with the Free Fantasia; but the public must have been pleased, for I was overwhelmed with applause. One reason for this may have been that the Germans know how to appreciate free improvisation. I am now doubly obliged to Wtirfel, for without his support and encouragement I should never have accomplished the daring enterprise which has succeeded so well. I shall be able to relate my experiences and impressions by word of mouth better than I can now. I was not hissed, so don’t be uneasy about my artistic reputation. 

The newspapers have been very favourable to me; if some of them should pick holes in me I am prepared for it. My compositions have received Count Gallenberg’s undivided approbation. The theatrical manager, Herr Demar, was very kind and pleasant; he did his best to encourage me before I appeared, so I went to my piano without much anxiety. 

My friends were scattered about the house that they might hear the observations of the critics, and the various opinions of the public. Celinski can tell you that he heard nothing unfavourable. Hube reports the most severe criticism, and that, too, from a lady : ” A pity the youth has so little presence.” If this is the only sort of blame I am . to receive, I cannot complain. 

I improvised on a subject from “La Dame Blanche,” and, that I might have a Polish theme, chose ” Chmiel.” The public, to whom this kind of national melody is quite unknown, seemed electrified. My friends in the pit say the people began a regular dance on the benches. 

….There is an almost unanimous opinion that I play too softly, or rather, too delicately, for the public here. That is because they are accustomed to the drum-beating of their own piano virtuosi. I am afraid the newspapers will say the same thing, especially as the daughter of one of the editors drums dreadfully; but never mind, if it is to be so, I would much rather they said I played too gently than too roughly. 

… The orchestra execrated my badly written score, and were not at all favourable to me up to the moment of my improvisation ; then, in concert with the public, they applauded heartily, which showed their good opinion of me. I do not yet know what the other artists think; but what can they have against me? They see that I do not play for pecuniary advantage. 

So my first performance, unexpected as it was, has passed off successfully. Hube thinks that one never succeeds in anything by ordinary means and according to preconceived plans, but must trust somewhat to chance. So I trusted to my good fortune and allowed myself to be persuaded to give the concert. If the newspapers cut me up so much that I shall not venture before the world again, I have resolved to become a house painter; that would be as easy as anything else, and I should, at any rate, still be an artist ! 

Nidecki was particularly friendly to me yesterday; he looked through and corrected the orchestral parts, and was sincerely pleased at the applause I received. I played on one of Graff’s pianos. I feel at least four years wiser and more experienced. 

You must, indeed, have wondered at my sealing my last letter with a strange seal. I was absent-minded and took the first and best that came to hand. 

Adieu, 

Your fondly loving, 

FREDERIC 

“Hats off gentlemen! A new genius!”

Robert Schumann relates, in his writings about “Music and Musicians” that at one of the gatherings of a certain circle of youthful enthusiasts of music in Leipzig, one of their members, pale and breathless threw some music on the table and exclaimed, “Hats off gentlemen! A new genius!” and began to play. These were the variations on the theme of “Don Juan” and when they ended none of those connoisseurs knew whose they were. “They are not Beethoven’s, nor Schubert’s and if not their’s , then who can compose like that?” On the title page stood “La Ci Darem la Mano Varie pour le piano par Fr. Chopin. Op.2” A second work! Their astonishment was without limits. “Something good at last! Chopin! Who is he? A genius.”

from “Chopin: As Revealed by Extracts from his Diary” by Count Stanislas Tarnowski